What does living with diabetes mean? How do you explain it to someone that doesn’t get it? How do you convey the seriousness of it when your child LOOKS healthy, acts fine, and the rest of the world would have you believe it is easily cured/fixed?  More »

Sorry for the dramatic headline, but I see posts like that every single day. Most often it is relating to an alert from a dog. See, this happened to me too, just this past weekend. 20150815-DSCF1638

More »

20140201-IMG_6609I love these posts, you know the ones: “We’ve only had Buster the Service Dog for 3 weeks, and already he has saved little Timmy’s life from low blood sugar 6 times! Little Timmy was 26 when Buster alerted!”. While I agree that these dogs have an amazing ability to pick up on sudden, out of the blue blood sugar issues, and it is always welcome to have another set of eye (or in this case, a nose) watching out for your child, there may be some other issue that needs to be addressed. Carb ratios, basal rates, growth hormones, puberty, illness, any number of things that might need to be looked at and considered to help your child.

More »

20141012-IMG_7637-3With the exception of 1 parent, everyone in this image is a type 1 diabetic. Look at all of them. They are happy. Smiling. Holding cute, amazing dogs. They were all gathered together for the Canine Hope For Diabetics 2014 Diabetic Alert Dog Conference at a gorgeous location in the Southern California woods. Perfect weather, lots of friends, dogs, great conversation, activities for the kids and the dogs, training sessions for the dog handlers, discussion groups about diabetes, diabetes technology, animal care and training, it was an amazing weekend. And I captured it all with my camera. So what’s not to love?

More »

8543236221_2d30950ec9_bAs a father of a type 1, I love meeting adult type 1’s that bust the stereotypes that we hear about constantly. We are barraged with poor quality of life stories, shortened life spans, poor health, blindness, amputations, the list goes on. And as the father of a female type 1, we hear a lot about how pregnancy is hard, ill advised, and a difficult and constant struggle of an experience.

Through my association with Canine Hope for Diabetics and being involved in local JDRF events, I have had the great honor of meeting many adult type ones living healthy, productive lives. Some are married, some are extremely successful, some have children, but all of them are kicking type 1 ass. I have reached out to a few of them to shed some light on common myths in the diabetic world. Here is the first in what I hope will become a series. Lori Mayfield, our guest blogger today, is a woman I met through Canine Hope. I have had the pleasure of knowing her for a few years, and even got to photograph her and her amazing dog RJ on the day they were forever placed with each other. Lori has been married for several years with a beautiful family, and I asked her to talk about her experience with pregnancy and type 1. Again, as a parent of a type 1 daughter, Lori is someone I really look up to and admire, a role model, and as we travel further through life with T1, I know she will be a huge wealth of knowledge and experience for our family to tap into. A huge thank you to Lori for doing this for us!

More »

4853938948_0708af175c_bI will never know what it is like to live life with type 1 diabetes. I will never know how fuzzy, off, and out of focus a 400 feels, and I will never know how disorienting and scary a 25 feels. As often as I ask, as often as I have had it explained to me, as often as I have witnessed these, and with as many diabetics as I have spoken with, I will still never truly understand.

More »

Night2On our Facebook page this week, I have been doing a series of screen captures of our CGM graph from overnight to show why we do night checks. In this graph above, you can clearly see that at 8pm she was low, at which point we gave her carbs. When we went to bed at 10 and checked her, she was sitting comfortably at 150, a good number for us for night time. My wife woke up at midnight to check her and she had gone up, a bounce back from the carbs administered at 8, she bolused her. Raven woke me up at 2, and Stella was hovering around 200 so I bolused again, and she woke up at a great 133 ready to start her day. A question came up though.

More »

10268525_870183936343173_6098667844353937_nIn January of 2013, we experienced a massive shift in our daughter’s blood glucose numbers. Her overnight numbers skyrocketed, and we were getting unexplained, random, and unshakeable highs. The reason? Puberty. She has experienced tremendous growth over the last year, and is now 5 feet tall. Just between her June and August Endo appointments, she shot up an inch and 4 pounds. Since January 2013, we have been making constant adjustments to basal rates to try and keep her BG numbers in check. Her A1C test result that January (which would have been for the 3 months prior) was our best ever at 6.9. Her next one 3 months later, all though still great for puberty, was 7.3, and since then we have gotten her down to 7.1 and working or butts off to get her there. Fast forward to last Thursday. More »

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...