11003235465_f8f15bb56f_bRaven is our night alerter. She sleeps in our room, next to our bed, on a Kuranda cot, as seen above. We have learned from trial and error, that if Raven sleeps on a pillow type dog bed, a foam mattress type bed, or in bed with us, she sleeps too hard and doesn’t wake up at night to alert. When she sleeps on the Kuranda cot, that is not an issue. She is able to wake up and alert just fine. That has been working well for us right up until… More »

On our Facebook page last week, I asked if any of our members had a topic about DAD’s or diabetes, and several great topics came up that I will be covering here soon. The first one I wanted to cover was from Jenn Demchuk. She writes:

“I would like to hear more about the bonds developed between the DAD’s and family members. How have they developed, which DAD is closest with Stella? Does Stella have a preference for one of them? What about with the other members of your family? Do you have a preference? Who’s personality meshes best with who? And I know they have different strengths and weaknesses as DAD’s (why you have two) but which one is the stronger or even more consistent?”

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9700620539_d01101b090_bMeet Canine Hope’s Lexi. In the picture above, she is the black lab. 🙂 More »

8200976371_5017cab6ef_bLet me preface all of this by saying that I am not a dog trainer or a breeder. I’m just a dad that decided that getting a service dog was important for our family. Since then, I have become more and more involved, met a lot of people, and learned a tremendous amount along the way. These are my thoughts on considerations that should be made on the journey towards aquiring a service dog. As always, take what I’ve made here, and salt it to taste. 🙂

Okay, so you’ve officially decided you want to pursue getting a Diabetic Alert Dog for yourself or your family. Now comes some big decisions. Many organizations offer different types/levels of dog. There are puppies for self training, started dogs, and finished dogs. I’m going to discuss these, and the responsibilities required of you for each type here. But first, let’s talk about several of the most common deciding factors families use to determine which type of dog to get. More »

Major&StellaI am not a dog trainer. I am a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes. And I’m a dog lover. I am always looking for a tool to help make diabetes management easier and safer for my child and a dog lover. So when my wife and I heard about DAD’s, we were very interested.

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8499608976_c994845dbc_bFresh off the heels of yesterday’s post about setting your dog up for success, comes this story from last night. Not only is it important to pattern your day for success, I can’t reiterate how important it is to know your dog, and learn their activity/sleep patterns. We have learned that Raven sleeps heaviest from 11-1 every night, and won’t alert between those times. More »

8733373815_d028cb96b1_bAt our house, we work hard and we play hard. That goes double for the Labs. Diabetic alert dogs use scent, and are “on duty” 24 hours a day, as they can’t turn their noses off, whereas some other types of service dogs can be off duty when home, or when the vest comes off.

As such, we try and build in some routine to our day, to know that when we need the dogs most, they will be rested and ready to perform, not exhausted or burnt out from the days activities. More »

When we talk about service dogs and training, we often talk about the need for training to continue forever. People assume service dogs are fully trained, and don’t need anymore. Untrue. Just like you and I, the dogs are pretty much “use it or lose it” . Whether it is for a newly learned behavior or scenario, or continuing training sessions/brush up sessions, something is happening everyday. Here is a perfect case in point, Night Alerting

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