1661616_814261655268735_7488107394780660463_nWe spend a lot of time in the car. Always on the run somewhere, and in Los Angeles, prone to extended periods of being stuck in traffic. While we are in the front seat, the kids aren’t technically far away, but I can’t tell what my daughter’s blood sugar is doing easily or safely while I am driving and she is in the back seat listening to her iPod, playing with her brother, or sleeping. Raven, one of our diabetic alert dogs (a DAD for short), does alert in the car. But we noticed recently that it was noticeably less often, so we decided to go back to the drawing board and work on fine tuning it a bit. This post gives you some background on where we started, some things we tried (that did or didn’t work), and where we are now.

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20140216-IMG_9612I was asked a GREAT question recently: “I wonder if you have tips on keeping up training with a dad. My daughter got hers in December and I want her to keep up her skills.” I realized that I talk a lot about how much work a service dog is, and how much on-going training is required, but I never really showed you what a daily or weekly training regimen looks like. This post will show you a lot of different things we do with our dogs to aid in our working, training, and handling of them on a daily basis. While there are occasions that these dogs get free time, we keep them pretty busy (and they keep us pretty busy) all day (and night) long.

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1781540_779684362059798_694877495_oStella and Raven have been working hard together at Rally over the past 6 months, and we continue to work our dogs daily. I have been working Raven off lead (no leash, all vocal commands) for several months, and at home in the safety of our backyard, with little or no distraction, Stella has been doing off lead work with her too.

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no-secrets-signI have spent a good deal of time telling you what to look for in a good DAD organization or a dog trainer. Here are a few things that should be a red flag/warning that will hopefully make you think about when you go through this process. More »

Today I am pleased to announce a special guest post written by Dorrie Nuttall. Many of you that follow us here know her as Luke’s mom (a young T1), self trainer of Jedi, and fellow member of our Canine Hope family. She has a huge following at her page on Facebook, where she provides wonderful information about diabetes, DAD’s, and being a parent of a type 1. That page is here: Saving Luke

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9178707077_27b02736cd_bThis may become part of a regular series in an effort to help you locate a great organization to get a diabetic alert dog from. First topic? How they raise their puppies. The first year of a dogs life is a very important time. Socialization, obedience training, maturity markers, vet care, there are so many milestones that need to be paid attention to, that how an organization raises their puppies should be an important part of your decision. More »

20140216-IMG_9480If you follow us on our Facebook page, you know that most every Sunday afternoon we pack up the pups and head to a rally class with other members of Canine Hope for Diabetics for their weekly hosted training session. So what exactly is rally? And what purpose does it serve?

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904122_600075823353987_450448929_o Night time alerting. Most often it is the number 1 reason someone cites for wanting a DAD. And it is often followed up with “and then we can sleep through the night” as if the dog will catch the low, go get a juice box, treat the low, and then go back to bed. Or catch the high, bolus to correct, and do all of that while you stay snuggled up in bed.

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