So you are considering a Diabetic Alert Dog (DAD) but don’t know where to start? Here are some relevant posts that I have written to help you get started on your journey in one easy place to find them. I have also included a link to a great site that will help you find a trainer/organization in your area.

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Thinking About Getting A Service Dog? My Advice To You

Things To Know Before Choosing An Organization

Should You Get A Puppy, Started, Or Finished Dog?

Night Alerts, The Holy Grail

How Do They Raise Their Puppies?

What Your DAD Organization SHOULD Tell You

Red Flag Warnings To Watch Out For

Looking for an organization, a trainer close to you, or answers to FAQ’s? Go here: diabeticalertdog.com

The organization that we got Major and Raven through is Canine Hope For Diabetics, we can’t say enough great things about them

10 Comments

  1. I just want to say thank you for this information. It sure is a lot to think about. I still feel that with everything you speak about, a DAD is a good option for my son and our family. I do have a question for you. Can you better explain the point about a current pet not being allowed to interact with the DAD. Would I need to get rid of my current pet or just keeping them completely separate? They can’t play together at all or can they interact under supervision???

    • Frank Wisneski

      We have always had pet dogs. However some organizations won’t place a SD with a family that has pets, please check with that organization. The SD will absolutely need to be supervised, their day is much different from the pet, and will create more work from you, requiring you to be very diligent with their training

  2. Wendy Champion

    Can you give me a price range on what it would cost to buy a trained dog? Just need to know if it is a
    financial possibility for us. Thank-You!

    • Frank Wisneski

      I have seen them run anywhere from $7500 to $30,000, depending on what organization you choose. Most everyone that gets a service dog has offset the cost by fundraising and crowd funding in some way.

  3. I know how service dog works for a blind person or a person with epilepsy. But how does it work for diabetes?

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  5. We recently acquired a SD for our daughter and it is a huge decision that should not be entered into lightly. With that being said if you are willing to make the commitment and put the time in(and it is quite a significant amount) the reward is amazing and the bond between my daughter and her dog is priceless.

  6. I have a 5 yr old sheltie that alerts to my highs and lows. He has never been trained and I hope I am handling it ok. He was trained as a show dog and was too shy so I adopted him at 11 months. He began the alerts after I’d had him 6 MO and it took me a while to connect what he was doing. I don’t know whether to look into further training or what to do

  7. My daughter has 3 diabetic children. Could one dog help 3 children especially at night?

    • Just some food for thought: While dogs can alert to multiple people, if 1 dog is expected to alert to 3 children, someone is almost always slightly out of range. Most likely 1 of 2 things will happen. Either the dog will learn that out of range is normal, because it is constantly smelling it and stop alerting, or the dog will become exhausted and shut down. (for this reason, I don’t suggest sending diabetic alert dogs to diabetic camp)

      The flip side of that is the dog may become a burden to the parents. If the dog is expected to wake someone up every time a blood sugar is out of range, there will be nights when as soon as a person lays back down the dog will wake them back up.

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